Summer Book Activities to Keep Reading Fun

MC Summer Book Activities from Fun-A-Day! submitted by Mary Catherine from Fun-A-Day.com.

As John Funk mentioned in Summer Reading Plan, children can lose valuable skills over the summer.  He suggested creating book activities to keep kids engaged in reading to prevent such a loss. I couldn’t agree more!  Meaningful learning happens every day, even when school’s out.

Below are summer-themed book activities for the kids to enjoy. The books listed can be read different ways, depending on the child’s reading strengths. Children can listen to a parent read the book in its entirety, kids can read the book out loud on their own, or parent and child can take turns narrating the action!

For Little Pirates

Read How to Become a Pirate by David Shannon. Ask the kiddo where she’d hide treasure if she were a pirate. I’m sure the answers will be entertaining! Then move onto “exploding” pirate treasure chests. Little pirates have to use science to find the hidden treasure!

For Little Beach Combers

Read My Shell Book by Ellen Kirk. Ask the child which shells are his favorites, or talk about shells found at a recent beach trip. Then break out the liquid watercolors to paint shells together! This open-ended art project is an easy way to decorate extra shells brought back from the beach.

For Little Campers

Read A Camping Spree with Mr. Magee by Chris Van Dusen. Discuss fun from past camping trips, or ask the child what she’d like to do when she goes camping.  Once all that’s done, work together to make a kid-approved camping treat.

Which book activities will your child enjoy the most? He doesn’t have to be limited to just one – maybe he wants to try all three! Be sure to check out Summer Reading Plan for more suggestions to help young readers over the summer months. And head over to Discount School Supply® to stock up your library for summer!

Summer Reading Plan

boy reading library

One of my student teachers recently shared with me an email that she had received from her site teacher just prior to the end of school. My student teachers begin their pre-service training in August and complete it at the beginning of April. They are a permanent part of their students’ daily experience during that time. The teacher in the class where this particular student teacher had been working shared with her the results of a writing activity in May. The assignment was to write about five things that they have learned during their second grade year. One of the students wrote, “I have learned that student teachers disappear and leave you missing them.”

I thought of this story when I recently discussed helping children retain the academic learning that they receive during the school year. Will some of the skills “disappear” without the child missing them? Maintaining and supporting learned skills during the summer months is an age-old problem facing teachers and parents. We can’t afford to have skills “disappear.” When I was a first and second grade teacher, I was often dismayed in the fall when it was evident that many of the students had lost their mastery of some of the basic skills over the summer. This seemed to be particularly true with children who struggle with learning, especially in reading and math. Because learning concepts has been such a struggle for them, when the summer months come, these children feel released from that “learning prison” and feel free to “not think.” When fall comes, they have often slipped even further behind and the struggle begins again. It is critical that parents and schools do everything possible to put a maintenance program in place for those summer months so that skills are not lost. One important element of any plan is reading.

The following list contains suggestions of ways to engage struggling readers during the summer. While the suggestions would work for all children, special attention has been given to struggling learners who need to feel engaged in books and build connections between reading and real-life excitement.

  1. Create a fun and challenging game with an incentive at the end of the experience. Three of my grandchildren attend a school that challenges their students to read a certain number of pages each summer. When school begins in August, the children bring their individual reading logs back to school and they are totaled for each classroom. The classrooms with the highest number of pages earn a half-day outdoor activity and treats. This has proven to be very successful for that school. For struggling readers, I might change the activity slightly and use a total number of books instead of pages. Since they struggle with reading, counting books may be more appropriate. I think this activity could be adapted to a family situation, with a visible chart in the home to record progress and an appropriate fun experience at the end.
  2. Turn books into projects and activities. Some of my fondest memories as a parent came while helping one of my children build a project centered around one of the books that we had read together. I remember helping one of my sons build his own bow and arrow after reading The Indian in the Cupboard by Lynne Reid Banks. There are so many great books out now that invite project development. I recently read, Sophie’s Squash (1) and thought how much fun it would be to plant a squash plant in a garden area or even in a pot as a follow-up to this engaging story.
  3. Visit the local library on a regular basis during the summer months. Public libraries often have displays and other activities that encourage children to read particular books. Sometimes, visiting the library can be an adventure. We have a spectacular main library in downtown Salt Lake City that is right on the train line. When my grandchildren are visiting, they love to ride the train from my house to the downtown library. Whatever the situation, make going to the library a fun adventure.
  4. Read with the child. It is very critical for the adults in a child’s life to model reading and display excitement and joy in reading. I read to my children routinely from an early age. Even with all of that reading time, I still had one child who struggled with reading early on in school. I know it was the constant modeling of good reading and having someone else share excitement about the contents that helped him overcome his difficulties. When a child is able to read, the adult should take turns with him. Reading books also gives the adult a chance to have discussions about various topics. Book discussions offer opportunities to talk about subjects that are difficult to discuss out of context. I remember having a discussion about families coming in different sizes, colors, and configurations with one of my children. The discussion was more natural and had a connection for her because of what we had read. It was more powerful than discussing the topic without any particular references. During the project I mentioned in #2 above, my son and I were able to have a great discussion about stereotypes and the Native American culture.
  5. Choose a comfortable place to read. By suggesting this I am not saying that summer reading can only take place in one spot. I am suggesting a comfortable place in the house (or even outside if the child has a yard) that makes reading comfortable and regular. Having a familiar place that quietly says, “Reading Time,” may make reading more pleasant for some children. I know a family that has reading time at 11:00 a.m. every morning when they are home during the summer. The children go to their “reading nook” and pick up their reading where they left off the day before. This is especially effective in this home because Dad sometimes reads at the same time as a model, or he reads with them individually.

We know that children who read regularly during the summer months are more likely to retain their reading skills from the previous school year. In fact, in many cases, the child is able to even improve on skills by regularly practicing what she has learned.

Here are a few recently published books that would be fun this summer:

Younger Children

(1)  Sophie’s Squash by Pat Zietlow Miller

Rufus Goes to School by Kim Griswell

Moo by David LaRochelle

If You Want to See a Whale by Julie Fogliano

Mr. Tiger Goes Wild by Peter Brown

Bully by Laura Vaccaro Seeger

Count the Monkeys by Mac Barnett

That’s Not a Good Idea! By Mo Willems

 

Beginning Readers

Check out the Elephant and Piggy Series from Mo Williams. There are lots of titles and the books are easy to read and very engaging and fun.

 

Older Children

Mr. Orange by Truus Matti

Paperboy by Vince Vawter

Flora and Ulysses by Kate DiCamillo

The Year of Billy Miller by Kevin Henkes

On Came Home by Amy Timberlake

Prisoner 88 by Leah Pillegi

Reading Aloud

This post is authored by John Funk.

boy reading library

Reading aloud to a child is an essential part of his development, a simple fact which continues to be reinforced by research on supporting children’s reading development. Children who are read to regularly usually have a larger vocabulary, more background knowledge and comprehension, a better grasp on how reading strategies work, and an opportunity to discuss and develop a stronger understanding about many aspects of life (1). In fact, when parents read with their child, the experience can provide a wonderful setting for developing a stronger bond and discussing current issues. Having a parent model reading is one of the best examples a child can have, especially if the child is a struggling reader.

While reading a book to a child is essential, it is also very important to discuss the contents of the book with her. In the book Starting Out Right from the National Research Council, a number of suggestions appear using the CROWD principals as a way to help the child develop reading and comprehension skills while listening and discussing a book (2). All interactions need to be kept light and fun and need to follow the interest of the child.

CROWD questions include:

  • C          Completion questions about the language in the book. For example, when reading The Tales of Peter Rabbit, “When Mr. McGregor started chasing Peter, he yelled, ‘Stop ______ (Thief)!’ ” The child fills in the blank.
  •          Recall questions related to the story content of the book, for example, “Do you remember what happened to Peter when he got home?”
  •         Open-ended questions to increase the amount of talk about a book and to focus on the details of the book, for example, “What is happening on this page?”
  •        “Wh” questions to teach new vocabulary, for example, “When Peter was running from Mr. McGregor, his jacket button got caught in a gooseberry net. The sparrows flew down to help. What is a sparrow?”
  •          Distancing questions that help the child bridge the material in the book to their real-life experiences, for example, “Have you ever been in a garden to see how vegetables grow?”(1)

While you certainly do not need to turn every book experience into a mini reading lesson, taking time to discuss what has been read is essential. Some of my most wonderful experiences with books have come when I was reading to or with one of my children or grandchildren. Books have brought us closer together and have assisted in helping all of us to become better readers and to develop sharper comprehension skills. It is never too early to begin, and you should make sure you don’t stop too early. I routinely read with my children until they finished elementary school and became too cool to read with Dad.

There is a wonderful website called Seussville that offers great suggestions for reading with a child.

Tips for Reading with Your Children from Seussville (3)

Pick a comfortable spot to read in – one with plenty of light.

Make it a routine – whether it’s right before breakfast or right before bed, set aside a special time every day.

Give lots of encouragement! Read the words aloud to your child. Point to the pictures. Say the words together. Laugh with your child.

It’s never too early. Reading can be a bonding activity for you and your new baby. Introduce reading in the very beginning, keep books in the nursery, and have your books out for baby and toddler to see!

The fun continues after the last page! When you finish a story, ask your child about his/her favorite passages, characters, and illustrations.

Every year we see more wonderful books that are especially good for reading aloud to a child. Here is a short list of recently published books that will make reading aloud to your child a delightful experience.

That’s Not a Good Idea by Mo Willems
The Dark by Lemony Snicket
Mr. Tiger Goes Wild by Peter Brown
Odd Duck by Cecil Castelucci
Open This Little Book by Jesse Klausmeier
Count the Monkeys by Mac Barnett
Bully by Laura Vaccaro Seeger
Xander’s Panda Party by Linda Sue Park
Extra Yarn by Mac Barnett
This is Not My Hat by Jon Klassen
A Sick Day for Amos McGee by Phillip Stead
Oh No! George! by Chris Haughton
Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs by Mo Willems
Each Kindness by Jacqueline Woodson (for older children)

References:

(1)   Whitehurst, G.J., F.L. Falco, C.J. Lonigan, J.E. Fischel, B.D. DeBaryshe, M.C. Valdez-Menchaca, and M. Caulfield. (1988). Accelerating language development through picture book reading. Developmental Psychology 24:552-559.

(2)   National Research Council, M. Susan Burns, Peg Griffin, and Catherine E. Snow, editors. Starting out right: a guide to promoting children’s reading success. 1999. National Academy Press, Washington DC.

(3)  Tips for Reading with Your Children from Seussville

(4)  The Hidden Benefits of Reading Aloud – Even for Older Kids

Environmental Print in the Classroom

submitted by Mary Catherine from Fun-A-Day.com.

we can read 4

An easy and meaningful way to enrich the print in a classroom is with environmental print!  As John Funk explains in Read the Room, creating a print-rich environment is incredibly important for early readers.  It can be even more so when a child is having trouble with reading tasks.

Environmental print refers to words, signs, and symbols that surround us on a daily basis.  Some examples include stop signs, store signs, and grocery staples.  Children are able to “read” environmental print because of the distinctive shapes and colors, along with the daily exposure.

we can read 2

Bringing environmental print into the classroom can help children as they’re learning to read.  Pre-readers are excited to have words they recognize up in their class.  Struggling readers can find comfort in these recognizable symbols, as well!

Towards the beginning of the school year, I gave my preschool students some important homework.  With their families, they collected examples of environmental print they could read.  As a class, we created a “we can read” space in our home center.  We’ve added to it over the year, and I’m sure it will be full by spring!

we can read 3

The children enjoy using my pointers when they’re reading our environmental print decoration.  It’s a very simple task, yes, but it allows the children to grow confident in their reading abilities.  It also helps them make connections between the written word and spoken language, as well as print-to-print connections.

we can read 4

How do you incorporate environmental print into your classroom?  I’d love to hear more ideas you may have!

If you’re looking for more early literacy ideas, I’d love for you to check out my Balanced Literacy Pinterest Board.

Mary Catherine is mama to a 6-year old kick in the pants, teacher to a fun group of pre-k students, and the force behind Fun-A-Day! She loves reading (especially science fiction), messy science experiments with her son, and dark chocolate!  You can connect with her on Facebook, Pinterest, Google+ and Twitter.

Reading the Room

This post is authored by John Funk.

This academic year I have spent extra time in a second grade classroom where one of my student teaching candidates is assigned.  The group is challenging for her because the host teacher in the classroom has not been successful in maintaining good classroom management.  I have tried to model and build positive relationships with some of the ‘special’ children in the group.

boy reading red shirt

One boy in particular is not only a behavior challenge, but he is also struggling with reading.  Recently, I was model teaching in the classroom to help my candidate master more management strategies.  I was working with this special child, and he was stressing about not being able to read his library book. He did not even want to make any attempt at the words, because he “couldn’t do it.”  Placing his library book aside temporarily, I challenged him to point to any words in the room that he could read.  He pointed and we read and we counted how many words he could read as we moved around the room.  He was thrilled about the 21 words he found.  His attitude toward reading turned around almost instantly.   He displayed great enthusiasm as we moved to decoding activities with his library book.  He was now confident he could do something.

The experience reminded me of the “Reading the Room” strategy that I used with my students on a regular basis when I was a classroom teacher.  I had forgotten how excited children feel about finally experiencing success when success has been eluding them.  Reading researchers continually remind teachers to display letters and words around the room. In a well-established and well-organized classroom, there should be print everywhere!  This does not negate the fact that visual picture reminders of classroom schedules, rules, etc., are critical to the social and emotional development of the children.  However, words should be placed next to any visual clue to help the children understand about print.  As the children become school-age, those words will eventually become more important than the visual clues.  Here are ways that a teacher can create a print-rich environment:

  • Posted Alphabet.  There should be at least two alphabet sets posted in every classroom.  These charts should be at the eye level of the children from preschool to 2nd grade.  I know that it is a bit challenging for classrooms with limited space.  However, keep in mind that items posted at eye-level or below are great learning tools for children.  Items posted above the child’s line of sight are decorations.
  •  Name Labels:  A child’s name is one of the best ways to teach about print.  A child’s name should appear at least 4-5 times throughout the classroom.  Attendance cards, cubby labels, helper boards, apron hooks, center tags and name puzzles are just a few possible ways to display each child’s name.  Even after the child becomes a reader, displaying his name, written correctly, continues to serve as a great model for writing and spelling.
  •  Item Labels: A good early childhood teacher will label every part of the classroom from the doors to the sink.  Block shelves, listening centers, writing tables and group areas should all have written labels indicating the word that best describes that area.  Each word displayed in an early childhood classroom should be accompanied by a picture of the item as a visual reminder about the word.
  •  Teacher Writing:  Teachers should look for every opportunity to model writing for the children in the group.  This can be an important part of a rug or circle time activity.  The children should be able to observe the teacher writing simple words and short sentences about something related to the topic of the day.  The teacher should say the words and talk the children through the writing during these modeling sessions, mentioning writing on the line, spacing between words, and the correct way to form letters.  A teacher’s handwriting should be as neat and clear as possible, even if the teacher is writing on a smart board.
  • Every Opportunity to Model Print: I knew a teacher who had everyone coming into the classroom ‘sign in.’ When a parent helper came in, she printed her name on the board to ‘sign in.’  I adopted this activity when teaching because I thought it was such a good model of print and gave the children another opportunity to read.

“Reading the Room” is great support for the development of reading skills.  It can also be a wonderful strategy when working with struggling readers.  We know that children’s attitudes directly impact how quickly they can pick up the components of reading.  It is sometimes a challenging task to get a struggling reader to feel positive and excited about reading.  It is difficult and daunting for her. Reading the Room just may be a way to spark enthusiasm for working on reading skills.

Snow, C.E., Burns, S., & Griffin, P. (1998). Preventing reading difficulties in young children. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Mastropieri, M.A. & Scruggs, T.E. (1997). Best practices in promoting reading comprehension in students with learning disabilities: 1976-1996. Remedial and Special Education, 18, 197-213.

Adams, M.J. (1990). Beginning to read: Thinking and learning about print. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Slavin, R.E., Lake, C., Davis, S., & Madden, N. (2009, June) Effective programs for struggling readers: A best evidence synthesis. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University, Center for Data-Driven Reform in Education.

Pocket Chart Poems for Teaching Reading and Name Recognition

submitted by Mary Catherine from Fun-A-Day.com

As John Funk explains in “Music and Reading”, children can learn a variety of important skills via songs, poems, and chants.  I love incorporating them into my preschool lesson plans because the kiddos learn so much while having a ton of FUN!  Using pocket chart poems and songs when teaching reading and name recognition is a favorite activity of mine.

MC TRC Pocket Chart Poems 1

Recently, my class and I did just that with the song “Old McDonald Had a Farm”.  We’d been discussing apples, pumpkins, harvest time, and farms over the past two months.  So “Old McDonald” was a great choice based on our recent themes, and the fact that the kids already knew the song.

To set up this activity, I wrote out the first few lines of the song on sentence strips.  From there, I added the sentence strips to our big blue pocket chart.  Once that was settled, I asked the children what animals we should have on our farm.  They chose cow, chicken, pig, sheep, and horse.  I just drew simple pictures of those farm animals on construction paper and added the animals to our pocket chart.  (If you’d rather have a printable version of farm animals, I have a free version at my Teachers Notebook shop). We already had sentence strips with our names on them, so I added those too.

Once the pocket chart was ready, I grabbed a pointer and we got started!  The sheep was up first, so I made sure to add the appropriate card to our pocket chart.  We sang the song together while I pointed to the words on the chart.  I didn’t have the last part of the song written out, but the kids were fine singing that on their own.

Once we went through all the farm animals, we decided to add the children’s names to the song.  This is ALWAYS a huge hit in my preschool classroom!  The kids like to see their names in any of our classroom activities, so that really grabbed their attention.  It also made the song even funnier for the children – they were giggling up a storm at “Old McMary Catherine had a farm . . .”!  A well-known song, their names, AND humor equaled an incredibly fun learning experience!

What did the kiddos learn from this short and silly pocket chart poem?

  • The concept of a word (“a word goes from space to space”)
  • We read from left to right and top to bottom
  • Name recognition – their own names, as well as their friends’ names
  • What we say can be written and what is written can be said
  • Simple farm animal words
  • Letter-sound correspondence
  • And much more!

What songs and poems do you enjoy using in the classroom?  Do your students have any favorites?

Mary Catherine is mama to a 6-year old kick in the pants, teacher to a fun group of pre-k students, and the force behind Fun-A-Day!  She loves reading (especially science fiction), messy science experiments with her son, and dark chocolate!  You can connect with her on Facebook, Pinterest, Google+ and Twitter.

Music and Reading

This post is authored by John Funk.

When I was a classroom teacher, I used music and songs for a variety of reasons. I found that music helped children become engaged in classroom activities. Most children enjoy music and songs, if they are fun and upbeat. Children respond to the presence of rhythm, beat, and physical actions. This type of music is different than forcing children to memorize a lengthy song for a program, which can be very tedious and inappropriate. However, for me, fun classroom songs are a wonderful transition tool to help maintain positive behavior standards while the group moves from one activity to another. Once I understood about the importance of phonemic awareness to pre- and beginning readers, I used music to help children listen for specific sounds and rhyming. I always believed that music and song would help children in many facets of life.

Songs with words have always been a tool for helping children learn to read and increase their reading skills. When a teacher teaches a simple song to the class, it is helpful for the teacher to have the words on a chart or board. This can help children associate the written word with the spoken word they are singing during the song. Repeating the song over a period of days supports the child in recognizing the written words of the song. Many teachers may give the child her own copy of the song lyrics and allow her to illustrate parts of the song. There is a growing body of research that indicates how singing has the potential for improving reading skills. (**Iwasaki, 2013).  From my personal experiences, I can attest to the fact that songs add enjoyment and a visual memory to the reading process.

The key is to choose songs that have words which will assist children on their reading levels. Even though we should strive to choose songs that reflect the child’s reading level, songs can also increase a child’s vocabulary by introducing new words that he may not yet find during reading instruction. I also know that music sticks in our memories. Many of us hear a song on the radio or in a production and continue to sing it or hear it in our heads for the rest of the day, especially if it has a catchy rhythm or lyric.  In a recent article in The Reading Teacher, the authors suggest that music can help with reading in the following areas:

  • Regular repeated singing of songs seem to help struggling readers progress in reading
  • Singing increases time spent reading when children can see the words of the song
  • Melody and rhythm help children remember
  • Songs help with the development of phonemic awareness (see our earlier posts)
  • Songs help teach word families (rhyming words)
  • Singing can model reading fluency
  • The ability to sing and read a song is an accomplishment for children who struggle with the ability to read a paragraph.  (**Iwasaki, 2013)

My personal philosophy has always been to find as many teaching strategies as possible to help children succeed. Multiple strategies are especially important for struggling readers. Most of them, including those with a true learning disability, are struggling because they have not been able to master reading under the strategies that have been used in their past. Music could be one more strategy that will help the pre-, beginning, and struggling readers in your classroom. Music that is used in an interesting and engaging manner in the classroom can add a lot of joy and fun to learning. Although there are many different types of music available, I have listed a few of my favorite age-appropriate resources at the bottom of this post. I do believe that music is an additional resource and strategy that can assist a child when learning to read or improving his reading skills.

**Iwasaki, B., Rasinski, T., Yildirim, K., Zimmerman, B. (2013) Let’s bring back the magic of song for teaching reading. The Reading Teacher,  67 (2), pp.137-141.

John’s Favorite Early Childhood Music CDs: